Cape Breton – part 2

Great Hall of the Clans

About the time the Acadians were being kicked out of Nova Scotia, Scottish Highlanders were leaving their country in droves and coming to (you guessed it) Nova Scotia. They particularly liked Cape Breton, with the land and weather very much like their beloved Highlands. Gaelic is alive and well here, home to the only Gaelic College in North America that also houses a museum and offers daily demonstrations of Gaelic culture.

Kilt
Kilts are made with a single piece of cloth. Traditionally used as a blanket at night, it would then be folded and tied around the waist to be worn during the day. 

One Scotsman who eventually settled here was Alexander Graham Bell, whose earliest passion was teaching the deaf. His fascination with sound eventually led him to quit his job so he could concentrate exclusively on experiments involving sound. Clearly a visionary, his aptitude for invention was fortified with unbridled imagination that led to a spectrum of patents.

AGB Historic Site
Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site in Baddeck 

AGB quote

Bras d'Or Lake
The Alexander Graham Bell National Historic Site overlooks Bras d’Or Lakes, a Unesco Biosphere site, balancing the needs of nature with the needs of the people.

The local Parish Hall in Baddeck hosts Cape Breton musicians every night during good weather, and last night we were lucky enough to get the last two seats. We tried to go back again tonight, but it was sold out. Ceilidh (pronounced kay-lee) is Gaelic for gathering.

 

10 thoughts on “Cape Breton – part 2

    1. We hadn’t really planned to go to Cape Breton, but we figured as long as we had come this far, we may as well. So glad we did! And I was so tempted to catch the ferry to Newfoundland!

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  1. The Bell museum was a highlight of our trip there. You can read more about him in the book Destiny of a Nation when he was trying to save President Garfield with an invention to locate a bullet. Thanks for your travel updates! Pat

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